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Quote1 ...that's Knight Watchman - with a "K"! Quote2[src]

History

Origin[]

When he was in college, Reid Randall had received a letter from his mother and learned that his brother Ted had gotten into gambling debts with criminals led by a man named "Gentleman" Mac Duggin who wanted to take over their family's garment business. Both Ted and his wife Janet were killed when their car exploded, inspiring Reid to become the Knight Watchman and defeat Mac Duggin and bring him to justice.

Forming The Knights of Justice[]

Knight Watchman had received a distress signal from Dr. Igor Eisner that Nazis had broken into his lab. He searched the scientist's lab and used one of his inventions; a jetpack, to fly into the sky and rescue him from his kidnappers in the Great Lakes. Then, Knight Watchman accompanied Eisner to the Great Minds Summit at the Smithsonian. He met his fellow heroes, Ultiman, Venus, the Badge, the Beacon, and the Blitz, who had also each accompanied an attendee to the Smithsonian, in addition to meeting President Franklin D. Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill. Together, the heroes had defeated the Nazi collaborator Dr. Henry Hyde, who had accidentally killed himself. Afterwards, the heroes formed the Knights of Justice; a name suggested by Ultiman.

Attributes

Powers

None

Abilities

Paraphernalia

Equipment

  • Knight Watchman's Suit

Transportation

  • Flying Shield
  • Watchwagon

Trivia

  • Knight Watchman is a pastiche of DC's Batman.
    • He "debuted" in Deductive Comics #25 in 1939 and was "created" by Tom King and Joe Kong of King-Kong Studios.
  • His origin was "first" revealed in Deductive Comics #36.
  • He was portrayed by Johnny Weissmuller in 4 B-films, the first being released in 1948 and produced by Sam Katzman.
    • Victor Mature was considered to replace Weissmuller for a proposed fifth film.
  • Clint Eastwood portrayed him in a 1969 reboot directed by Sergio Leone and was replaced by Burt Reynolds in a sequel titled "The Knight and His Squire" and a third film was directed by Richard Lester.

See Also

Links and References

References

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